Casanova, Lottery and the Taking of the Bastille


Casanova’s reputation as a lover has by far surpassed his ability as a businessman. Yet the famous Venetian knew how to combine his pleasure with business. And his main business in mid-XVIII century Paris was lottery. In 1757 Madame Pompadour had introduced the Italian adventurer to the Court of Versailles for the purpose of creating a financial scheme that would allow Louis XV to construct the Military School on the Champs de Mars. Such was the remarkable beginning of the Royal Lottery. Its end is equally worthy of a mention. It came in 1776, and its connection with the taking of the Bastille has perked my attention. For even though the Parisians were busy storming and destroying the bastion of tyranny, they did not forget two days after to show up at the last drawing of their other most favorite event.

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About versaillesgossip, before and after Francis Ponge

The author of the blogs Versailles Gossip and Before and After Francis Ponge, Vadim Bystritski lives and teaches in Brest France. The the three main themes of his literary endeavours are humor, the French Prose Poetry, the French XVII and XVIII Century Art and History. His writings and occasionally art has been published in a number of ezines (Eratio, Out of Nothing, Scars TV, etc). He also contributes to Pinterest where he comments on the artifiacts from the Louvre and other collections. Some of his shorter texts are in Spanish, Russian and French.
This entry was posted in Casanova, French Revolution, Louis XV, Madam Pompadour, Madame Pompadour. Bookmark the permalink.

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