The Legend of Baron Batz


800px-Plaque_Batz

Many buildings in Paris are associated with conspiracies, but this sign marks the spot: while Louis XVI was transported from Temple to his appointment with guillotine, Baron Batz with a handful of committed royalists was ready to free the king! Most of the conspirators got massacred but Batz walked. He always did. I do not hesitate to name Batz as the first mission impossible hero, all be it all his missions failed, being genuinely impossible; nevertheless, it is insane how close he would get to actually pulling them off. Robespierre, who had a price put on Batz’s head, for a while depended on him, so famous was Batz for his financial schemes. He was the only one ready to finance any crazy idea, and this is probably why he was involved in so many: A simple explanation to the phenomena would be equating Batz’s ability to organize with his ability to corrupt everything around him, which takes us back to his ability to make money at the time when nobody had any. We know that he could give Louis XVI 500 000 livres right when the King needed it, or offer the jailers of Marie-Antoinette a million, creating a havoc that almost led to her escape. What is amazing in all of these legendary escapades is Batz’s ability to keep one step ahead of his pursuers — always on the run, but while fleeing, always looking for a new weapon.Jean-PierreBatz

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About versaillesgossip, before and after Francis Ponge

The author of the blogs Versailles Gossip and Before and After Francis Ponge, Vadim Bystritski lives and teaches in Brest France. The the three main themes of his literary endeavours are humor, the French Prose Poetry, the French XVII and XVIII Century Art and History. His writings and occasionally art has been published in a number of ezines (Eratio, Out of Nothing, Scars TV, etc). He also contributes to Pinterest where he comments on the artifiacts from the Louvre and other collections. Some of his shorter texts are in Spanish, Russian and French.
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